(Source: plumspucked)

(Reblogged from errantlight)

withquestionablewit:

"we’re not all like that!" yeah i know but if you weren’t like that you’d be doing something to make people like me safer instead of saying something to make people like you look better

(Reblogged from withquestionablewit)
Writers don’t write from experience, though many are resistant to admit that they don’t. I want to be clear about this. If you wrote from experience, you’d get maybe one book, maybe three poems. Writers write from empathy.
Nikki Giovanni (via word-spinning)

(Source: amandaonwriting)

(Reblogged from brocadearcade)

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

(Reblogged from reclaimingthelatinatag)

truc-machin-bidule:

Step 1: Comment on a woman’s attractiveness on every single occasion in every single venue no matter how irrelevant it is. Build up a dating culture entirely dependent on a female’s beauty. Teach children that only attractive women will ever get anywhere in life, will ever be praised, will ever find love and have a family, will ever have a chance at happiness, are worth knowing, are worth being.

Step 2: Mock women for caring about how they look. Call them shallow.

(Reblogged from naya-and-lana)

Rashida Jones and I have a game: We decide for three months how we’re going to dress, like Japanese Executive, Little House on the Prairie, Female Sailor on Leave. A couple of months ago, our look was Eighties Art Dealer: Black blazers with shoulder pads, high-waisted jeans, air-dried hair and big eyebrows.

(Source: imnotcranky)

(Reblogged from trashybooksforladies)

dailycatdrawings:

289: Rough Day!

This week is off to a bumpy start :/ Is it the weekend yet?

(Reblogged from dailycatdrawings)
I write and that way rid myself of me and then at last I can rest.
Clarice Lispector (via writingquotes)
(Reblogged from merrymiaow)
(Reblogged from markdoesstuff)

prettyarbitrary:

Yes, ‘they’ is a bona fide gender-neutral singular pronoun in English.

Chaucer used it in the Canterbury Tales.  That usage of the word predates modern English as a language.

(Reblogged from fckyeahitslauren)